Creative CNC-Where Art and Automation Collide
Register Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Steve Luck

Registered:
Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #1 

I was wondering what is your favorite bit you use for different materials. Although I understand that a ballnose bit is great for carving 3D pieces, it seems to work well on many other materials. I seem to favor my tapered 1/8 inch ballnose for cutting insulation pink or blue foam (for practice cuts) because it happens to be about 2½" long and works great on thicker foam. The workhorse seems to be the ¼" end mill which always does a fine job.

I attended the 3D signcamp in Indiana this year and met a guy who told me about a bit he uses to cut coroplast that leaves a very smooth edge after cutting. I misplaced my notes where I had written it down, but I think he said single flute. Does that sound right? Learning about different bits is a little overwhelming so any great advice on what works for you will be very helpful.

Sign-cerely, Steve

oxenham1

Avatar / Picture

Administrator
Registered:
Posts: 146
Reply with quote  #2 
Hey Steve!
I use ball nose nose cutters for anything 3d. I do like the tapered cutters, but they aren't the best for every project we do, due to the tapered angle.
I don't have a tool changer on our Techno, so I tend to rough and finish with the same tool, whenever I can, although I have the ball nose set up differently depending on rough or finish pass.
I don't cut any coroplast, but I cut tons of pvc, and always use a 2 flute straight bit found in the router section at any big box store. Availability is key for me. I really like the fact that using the straight flute jams the chips back into the cut. It doesn't melt the chips, just packs them in tight enough to stop the part from coming out after the cut is finished.
I hope this helps a little!
JO

__________________
Jamie Oxenham http://www.oxenhamdesign.com
http://www.fromaspiretobeyond.blogspot.com

http://forums.oxenhamdesign.com/post/3d-summer-modelling-challenge-6946988?pid=1283204501#post1283204501

Dan Sawatzky

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 96
Reply with quote  #3 
We have an auto tool changer and six places for tools. I have quite the range of tools as well, the bulk of which never get used..

The table mill (2") is used for just that - surfacing my spoil board.

I use my 3/8" ball nose for roughing things out.

The 1/8" tapered ball nose is used for all finish 3D work, save for real tiny stuff where we use a 1/16" ball nose in small areas.

For cutting out I use my 3/8" x 2 1/2" long end mill for the bulk of our stuff.

-grampa dan

__________________
Dan Sawatzky
Sawatzky's Imagination Corporation
http://www.imaginationcorporation.com
dan@imaginationcorporation.com
Steve Luck

Registered:
Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks guys for the response. It is interesting to see what bits and why they are used explained here. I am still experimenting with them and with each project, I try and see if a different bit would work better.
So far, I have had good "Luck" with everything I've tried. Also I'm curious as to who you get your bits from. It seems their are quite a few suppliers in the magazines so I guess it depends on where you live and how quick they can be shipped.

Sign-cerely, Steve
Dan Sawatzky

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 96
Reply with quote  #5 
We use on Onsrud bits which I buy through my local MultiCam dealer. I've had great results and few breakages (unless I do something silly)

-grampa dan

__________________
Dan Sawatzky
Sawatzky's Imagination Corporation
http://www.imaginationcorporation.com
dan@imaginationcorporation.com
Leo Voisine

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 54
Reply with quote  #6 
I work in the metal cutting industry and I a lot of access to cutter sources and information.

Wood and sign making and various materials in this creative industry differ greatly from metal cutting - but there are similarities too.

I am a bit cheap - and I look for ways to save on price but not compromise on quality.

Based on many years of experience, I know a good cutter by looking at it. 
I cannot tell you how to do that, in a typed format.

I have just recently tried a ball nosed tapered end mill.  Dollar price per cutter floored me when I first looked at that - so I searched and I found a source to supply what I consider a quality cutter at less than the common price.

I am liking working with the tapered mill.  It has the strength of a larger tool, with the precision of a small ball nosed cutter - it also has the "reach" of a "long" end mill with the strength of a stubby.

I paid $33.00 each for a 1/4 shank 1" length of cut and 1/8 ball nose.

When I get home later, I will look up the supplier.

__________________
Imagine the possibilities
Ernie Balch

Registered:
Posts: 14
Reply with quote  #7 
I use a 1/4 inch onsrud downcut endmill when ever possible.  I also use an Onsrud 1/8" tapered ball nose for 3D work.  For V-carving we like the Gerber 90, 110 and 130 degree 1.25" cutters.

For cutting 3/4" MDO we use an Onsrud 1/2" chip breaker finish cutter.  It zips through the MDO like butter,  instead of breaking like the 1/4" end mills.
Steve Luck

Registered:
Posts: 19
Reply with quote  #8 
Thanks Ernie. I imagine with a ¾" bit, you are cutting out shapes from the MDO? How are the edges? Any sanding needed? I have lots of scrap pieces of MDO and was trying to decide what to make out of them. I didn't really know what bit would work best. I will probably v-carve a few names, phrases, etc. and then
cut out the shape. Thanks for sharing.

Sign-cerely, Steve
Ernie Balch

Registered:
Posts: 14
Reply with quote  #9 
I always had trouble with bit breakage when cutting 3/4 MDO.  The bits would just scream and then break after a few min..  no way to make money.

Finally had to talk with an expert...The chip breaker smooth finish 1/2" bit from Beckwith Decor cuts like a dream.
mikeacg

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 32
Reply with quote  #10 
Leo,

I would love to have your source for 1/8" tapered bits (Yup! I broke one... My fault which makes it worse!)

Mike

__________________
Mike Schnorr
http://www.artcentergraphics.com
http://www.baconwood.com
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:


Create your own forum with Website Toolbox!